Dogs cakes and drug doctoring: dogs and the retail chemist at the turn of the 19th century.

August 26th marks National Dog Day.[i]

The dog is of great importance to the history of medicine. Dogs have played a role for developing new treatments for an array of diseases, most notably diabetes mellitus. In 1889 Joseph von Mering and Oskar Minkowski demonstrated that by removing the pancreas from a dog, the animal developed diabetes: this led to the discovery that insulin regulated sugars in the blood.

The dogs’ significance in the history of research extends into developments of vaccines, toxicity tests and blood transfusions. There is more information on this rather grim history at:

http://www.animalresearch.info/en/designing-research/research-animals/dog/

This article focuses on a slightly happier story, the history of the dog biscuit and the wider context of the retailing of animal products and veterinary medicines within the medical marketplace.

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Mystery apparatus

sebian barrelbure 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An apparatus made from barrels played an important public health role in the early 20th century.

What is the name of the apparatus shown in these photos ?

Where and when was it used?    What was it used for?

There is a clue in the second photo which is a reconstruction, not the original,  made by the National Museum of Valjevo,

the photos are taken from http://www.valjevo-hospital.org/  with permission.

Gresham lectures – programme and videos

The  programme for the 2016-17 Gresham College Lectures is now available at:   http://www.gresham.ac.uk/

The lectures are of a high standard and are free. Several relate to the history of medicine.

Past lectures are available as video downloads. These include :

“Germs , Genes and Genesis: the History of Infectious Disease”  by Prof Steve Jones and

“War Health and Medicine” by Prof Mark Harrison

Mystery plant

IMG_1147

I photographed this plant at Lopham Fen in Suffolk this week.

How does it relate to the history of medicine?

A clue is in the botanical name.

Chris Derrett