New collection of medical photographs

Thanks to a grant from the Wellcome Trust, the Historic England Archive has completed a 12 month project to conserve, digitise, and catalogue a collection of photographic prints showing health and social care in Britain between 1938 and 1943.

The Mozelle Sasson High Voltage X-Ray Therapy Department at St Bartholomew’s Hospital, 20th January 1939. (MED01/01/0123)  Source: Historic England Archive

The 4,071 black and white photographs were taken by Norman Kingsley Harrison for the Topical Press Agency, and were only recently rediscovered in the Historic England Archive. The Topical Press Agency, established in 1903, supplied newsworthy photographs to the Fleet Street press and specialist journals. While it is not clear why all of the photographs in the collection were taken, it is possible that some were produced for journals such as Nursing Times. Each photograph is accompanied by a detailed caption written by the photographer, which has been transcribed and supplemented by further research.

A broad range of subjects is covered by the Medical Collection, including medical procedures, child welfare, blood transfusion, and nurses’ training. Wartime healthcare and nursing feature heavily, including auxiliary and military hospitals, improvised wards, and bomb damage.

The collection reveals a snapshot of 1930s and 1940s Britain, and shows a health service responding to the demands of a country at war. Significantly, many of the sites shown in the photographs have changed dramatically or have been destroyed or transformed, giving added significance to the collection as a photographic record.

Captivating oral history interviews with nurses who trained and worked in the 1940s and 1950s also form part of the Medical Collection, and a short film featuring the interviews and photographs has been published on YouTube.

The collection offers insights into the history of nursing, rehabilitation, specific procedures, and healthcare in the years prior to the founding of the NHS. It also provides a fascinating record of the development of social care, and documents ground-breaking medical developments during the Second World War, the beginnings of the National Blood Service, and the nursing of military casualties.

More information can be found at www.historicengland.org.uk/medical, and the digitised photographs can be viewed at archive.historicengland.org.uk by searching “MED01”. Low resolution images are available for free, and high resolution images for personal non-commercial use can be ordered free of charge. For more information about ordering, please contact archive@historicengland.org.uk

Abigail Coats, Cataloguing Officer, Historic England Archive

Archibald Watson Lecture 2018

Photograph of Archibald Watson (taken around 1890)

Archibald Watson FRCS (1849 – 1940) was an Australian surgeon and professor of anatomy at the University of Adelaide. He is commemorated in the prestigious Archibald Watson Lecture of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons and the Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

The 2018 lecture was given by Peter Burke a member of the BSHM. Peter’s lecture graphically illustrates the colourful career of this brilliant but mercurial man.

Watson’s medical education included study in England, France, and Germany. He entered and passed the ‘College and Hall’ in London (MRCS and LSA) and was later awarded 2 MDs and FRCS. During his life, Watson served in the Boer War and World War 1 and travelled widely. He taught anatomy, pathology and operative surgery in Adelaide and achieved an unrivalled reputation as a teacher and consultant.

Peter Burke’s lecture can be viewed at
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1lPm7NtIbUceNwGKDJCMd8GnHC1lg8oSJ/view?usp=sharing

Chris Derrett

Jenner, Fewster and Jesty

Jenner vaccinating (Gillray) – Courtesy Wellcome Images

On the 14th May 1796 Edward Jenner carried out the first stage of his now famous vaccination experiment and inoculated a young boy named James Phipps with cowpox. To this day Jenner’s name is associated with the discovery of vaccination as a concept, and the worldwide eradication of smallpox. However, there were others who helped light the path to Jenner’s discovery, and even carried out that same experiment decades before Jenner.

Vaccination could not have happened without the development of variolation; the process of inoculating healthy individuals with smallpox matter in order to confer immunity against the disease. It was based on the observations that a primary attack of smallpox often provided a degree of immunity against contracting the disease again in the future. It was introduced to Britain in the early eighteenth century by Lady Mary Wortley-Montagu, who had come across the concept of ‘smallpox parties’ whilst living in Turkey. Following the successful variolation of her own son, she also had her daughter inoculated with smallpox matter in 1721 by the surgeon Charles Maitland. Others soon followed suit, including a royal variolation when George II had his two daughters inoculated with smallpox, at the request of his wife Caroline, Princess of Wales.

The concept gradually spread across the country, but it was not until it reached the county of Suffolk and the ears of a young surgeon named Robert Sutton, that it truly took off. Sutton advertised variolation as a service, including bed and board with the added incentive of ‘tea, wine, fish and fowl’ all for a monthly fee. Gradually inoculation houses started to appear across the country, inspired by the likes of Sutton and his business enterprise.

It was at one of these inoculation houses that in 1768 John Fewster, a Gloucestershire surgeon and apothecary, recognised that a great number of patients could not be infected with smallpox. On enquiry he discovered that they had all previously been infected with cowpox. He made note of this and communicated it to a small medical society of which he as a member at the time. It just so happened that Edward Jenner was also present at this society meeting, as a young apprentice to another local surgeon named Daniel Ludlow. Fewster was a strong supporter of the Suttonian method of variolation and he did not recognise the importance or see the need at the time for the development of inoculation with cowpox.

It would be wrong to talk about the history of vaccination without mentioning Benjamin Jesty (1736-1816), a dairy farmer from Yetminster, in Dorset. Not only did he recognise the protective effect that cowpox had over smallpox, but he also went so far as to vaccinate his wife and children with cowpox in 1774, at least twenty years prior to Jenner’s famous experiment. Furthermore he tested his vaccination trial in 1789 when his two sons were variolated by their local doctor and they did not go on to exhibit any signs of a reaction. Jesty unfortunately did not go on to publish his results, and perhaps due to the public outrage that ensued when the locals discovered that he had inoculated his family with animal matter, did not go out of his way to publicise them either. However, his experiment did not go unrecognised, and he was invited to attend George Pearson’s Original Vaccine Pock Institute in 1805. The physicians at that institute decided that Jesty’s experiment had pre-empted Jenner’s, and they awarded him with a testimonial scroll stating just this.

It is evident that the history of vaccination is more complex than the well-known story of Jenner, the milkmaid and the cow. The concept of cowpox being protective against smallpox was reportedly widely known throughout the dairy country in England and across the continent in Germany. However, it cannot be disputed that Jenner was the only one to make this fact publicly known and to recognise the importance that this discovery could have in the fight against smallpox. It was his determination and dedication to the subject which subsequently led to the World Health Organisation declaring the eradication of smallpox on 8th May 1980.

More can be discovered about this fascinating subject by paying a visit to Dr Jenner’s House, Museum and Garden in Berkeley, Gloucestershire. https://jennermuseum.com/

Roy Porter, ‘The Prevention of Smallpox’, in The Greatest Benefit to Mankind. A Medical History from Antiquity to the Present.(London: HarperCollins, 1999) 275-6

S.L. Kotar and J.E. Gessler, Smallpox: A History (North Carolina: McFarland & Company, 2013),18

Robert Jesty and Gareth Williams, ‘Who invented vaccination’, Malta Medical Journal, 23, 2 (2011) 29-32

Lydia Thurston and Gareth Williams, ‘An examination of John Fewster’s role in the discovery of smallpox vaccination’, J R Coll Physicians Edinb,45 (2015) 173-179

Lydia Thurston

Arnica Pharmaceutical Jar

 

Can you help the Archivists at Boots Nottingham to identify the figure on the lid of this beautiful pharmaceutical jar?

Some officers of the British Society for the History of Medicine recently visited the Boots Archives in association with the Annual meeting of the British Society for the History of Pharmacy. We were shown this beautiful Arnica pharmaceutical jar. Discussion ensued regarding the figure on the lid of the jar. Several suggestions were made. We agreed to ask members for the British Society for the History of Medicine for their opinions.

Mike Collins

Papworth 100

Patients on the balcony of the Bernhard Baron Hospital, Papworth Village Settlement

Royal Papworth Hospital is a leading cardiothoracic hospital and is best known for its trailblazing work in transplantation since performing the UK’s first successful heart transplant in 1979. However, Papworth has a long standing tradition of pioneering work since its inception as a tuberculosis colony, 100 years ago.

At a time when 41,800 in the UK died from tuberculosis, a young Welshman Dr (later Sir) Pendrill Varrier-Jones was appointed Cambridgeshire TB Officer during WWI. Following sanatorium treatment patients would risk a relapse when they returned to the overcrowded, unsanitary and damp conditions which had led to infection in the first instance. Frustrated by this cycle, Varrier-Jones took a holistic approach to care and wanted to develop a combined treatment and rehabilitation facility that would leave patients, “a useful and productive member of society, a man who, though a consumptive, has learned to be a consumptive, to lead the life of a consumptive and even enjoy that life.”

Having successfully established treatment for a small number of patients in 1916 in the nearby village of Bourn, Varrier-Jones’ vision went through a process of rapid expansion. Papworth Hall was purchased following a large charitable donation in 1917 with the first patients arriving on 12 February 1918.  Patients were prescribed bed rest, a hearty diet and ample fresh air. Once the patient’s condition had improved they were moved onto graduated work within one of the light industries and provisions were available for family members to also settle in the village. Sir Varrier-Jones’ revolutionary aim was to treat the “whole-person,” by providing treatment, suitable employment and allowing patients a home life.

With the discovery of streptomycin in the 1940s, the number of TB patients declined and what was then known as the Papworth Village Settlement opened its remit to include people with other disabilities. This led to the creation of the Papworth Trust, a charity which continues to support disabled people. In 1948, the hospital officially became part of the NHS and became known as Papworth Hospital which moved from the treatment of TB to specialise in chest medicine.

2018 is an important next chapter for us. It’s the year when we become Royal Papworth Hospital, commemorate our centenary, celebrate the 70th anniversary of the NHS, and move from the village of Papworth Everard to our new state-of-the-art hospital located in the Cambridge Biomedical Campus. We’ve made a film to commemorate with the support of the Heritage Lottery Fund (for trailer click here) with the first screening coinciding with the NHS’ 70th birthday on 5th July at the Cambridge Arts Picturehouse, this will be followed by screenings in the village of Papworth Everard on 21st July (to book click here) with additional screenings planned for the autumn. This film and screenings were made possible with a generous grant from the Heritage Lottery Fund and the Papworth Hospital Charity

Nico Ferguson, Heritage Assistant
Royal Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust